October, 2015

Views from a Recent Graduate


When I first started practicums (which feels like ages ago), my first supervisor told me to "work under as many different therapists as you can" to see different styles and ways of working alongside different clientele and focuses. Since then I've worked in numerous clinics under different ATs and even a Chiro/AT. I've attended extra seminars and conferences, and begun my own training and movement client base under the supervision of my mentor. I took that advice to heart and tried my best to learn and observe a variety of treatment styles, even if they didn't always match up with my own philosophies. What better way to learn and grow your own ideas than to experience others’ ideas?

Recently, after a discussion on different treatment styles, philosophies, and options, I was asked by a young patient’s mother what kind of Therapist I wanted to be. After close to 4 years observing, practicing under supervision, and interning, you'd think I'd have a fluent answer to give. Yet, I struggled with my answer. It's not that I don't have an idea or a perception of who and what I'm becoming as a professional, but it was how to describe it.

The thing with the profession I'm in is that pretty much every successful and practicing AT/Kinesiologist I've met has the same vision for what we do. Varying ways to get the same thing done. Yes, personalities and treatment styles are different but the atmosphere and goals are generally the same. Some may focus more on manual/soft tissue work while some may focus more on movement modalities. Some attend conferences and seminars on one thing, while others attend with interest in another. But at the end of the day, they all want their patients to get better, be better, and live better. They accomplish this with patient education, continuing education for themselves, evidence-based treatments, and knowledgeable exercise therapy programs.

So… what kind of therapist do I want to be?

Early on I recognized I had a love for solving a problem and improving performance. This is one reason I fell in love with biomechanics and movement correction. Not only do these areas benefit athletes of all levels, they are practical and useful to general population clients as well. I've always had a thing for teaching and empowering people, which has blossomed as I've progressed into this career choice. The past month or so I've had the pleasure of seeing a client progress from being unable to walk without the support of crutches and deal with two legs that just would not do his bidding, to being able to walk across the room standing up straight and unsupported. His renewed positivity and insatiable drive to keep improving is inspiring and motivating to say the least. Every patient or client I have that realizes their own ability to improve themselves is something that inspires and motivates me. I've realized more and more lately how blessed I am to have found a career that enables me to empower others, and also brings substance and meaning to my own life. This is something I'm very grateful for.

Of course there are days where I'm tired, I'm unmotivated, and I'm nervous for my upcoming certification exams. Some of those days I still end up working with clients, or doing my jobs, and I always come out of the day feeling better and a little more motivated. Leading up to my exams this fall, I am both nervous and excited. I know I have a solid base to support me and I have a preparation plan leading up to the actual exams. More than anything I feel undeniably ready to take this next step in my career path. As someone who is always about 5 years ahead of herself, this exam is only a doorway to the next thing.

I want to be a therapist that is inspiring, knowledgeable, and trustworthy. I want my clients to leave sessions feeling like they have the tools to help themselves. I never want to stop learning, or lose the ability to adapt to each patient and work in a style that best suits them. I want to be a chameleon therapist that can fit into anyone's mindset, see through their eyes, and change their perceptions on their body, health, and lifestyles if needed. I want to promote my profession and help change the way the world views healthcare. I want to help athletes better themselves and be the best they can be. I want it all, and I'm determined to get it.

This week I completed my interning hours and finished my last university course. 1200 hours plus some in clinic and field on top of 4 years in University, all leading up to this fall's exams. I have an excellent support system behind me, and an every better vision for who I want to become. I think it's a question every aspiring AT should ask themselves what kind of therapist do I want to be? The way to finding the answer takes blood (usually other's), sweat and tears... but as any journey often is, it's worth it. Here's to the next step in this adventure!

Kathlyn is a recent grad from the University of Winnipeg, and attempting November's exam. She writes regularly on her blog www.katmah.wordpress.com  


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